Carting Your Kayak – Words and Images by Dale Baxter

When I purchased my Hobie Pro Angler just over 12 months ago there was a lot of debate around getting the larger platform versus the lighter and more manageable Outback. This had me wondering if I would have to use my roof racks or also purchase a trailer for the kayak.

What I liked about the idea of purchasing a Kayak was that you didn’t have to tow around a bulky trailer and find parking for it, or store it somewhere when it wasn’t in use. I really wanted to purchase the PA as the extra room and stability was a must and didn’t particularly like the idea of sitting in a wet seat all day like in an Outback. Also being able to confidently stand and cast was a must.

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Knowing the specs on the PA’s, one thing they aren’t, is light, at just under 50kg unloaded and 69kg fully loaded they can be a little bit of a handful to move around. I had seen a number of different loading systems and was trying to work out what was going to work for me. I liked the idea of the side loading arms that were around and after talking to a few different people in the know I decided that would be the best option.

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Having access to some old unused roof racks through my work. It didn’t take me long to knock up a side loading arm to suit. The roof X bars that I had were the Thule brand however the arm that I made could be used on most systems.  It is very easy to use and remove. It also means that for Urban breaming I can park anywhere there is a car space on the side of the river and have worked out how to launch of the local jetties which makes access so much better.

I do see the merit in possibly owning a trailer in the future as the tournaments I did last year I had to load on the roof and all your gear is inside doesn’t leave much room for anyone else. Fuel economy should also be improved with a trailer as there would be far less wind resistance. So to take the family away with you or even a fishing buddy the trailer means it is easy to load and unload as well as carry most of your gear on the kayak, meaning more room for everything else.

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Attached you will see a sequence of shots of how I load and unload the kayak by myself, it is easily managed and relatively fast to do. Can usually have it unloaded / loaded and ready to go in around 20 mins.

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