Daiwa Certate 2013 review

Back in 2006, I purchased my first Certate reels not long after I first started fishing.  Certate was the reel I aspired to own, and I still have those reels and they are still going strong – being regulars in my starting lineup, no matter the application.

Earlier this year I got myself one of the new Certate 2013 reels in the 2004 size. My first impression was that it is a very sexy reel, jam-packed full of features, and I haven’t been disappointed.

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Image courtesy of Bradley Sissins – http://www.shottobits.com.au

The Real 4 Technology is still the cornerstone of the latest Certate’s, which have also added all of the latest Daiwa Reel Innovations. Yet, with all of the technical advancement that has gone into these new reels, in my opinion, Mag Seal is by far the stand out feature.

My main criticism of the old Certate reels was the amount of servicing that they required.  Not unreasonable really, when you think about it, because the fine tolerances of such a finely tuned piece of machinery can be so easily disrupted by ingress of dust and salt into the guts of the reel.

Like most others, my reels tend to cop a hiding.  Fishing mostly salt water,  they are exposed to all of the elements.  Sun, rain, wind, salt spray, you name it, the elimination of dust and water ingress, by the Mag Seal technology can only be a positive thing.

Mag Seal on my other reels has increased the life expectancy of my gear, keeping it in optimum, reliable condition, and I can’t see it being any different with the Certate.

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Image courtesy of Bradley Sissins – http://www.shottobits.com.au

In general, I tend to fish my Certate reels with braided line.  I’m not sure why, maybe it’s to do with my legacy Certate’s which I purchased long before I started fishing straight through fluorocarbon lines.

So out of the box I spooled the new Certate with braid, to take advantage of the new rigid and lightweight Zaion Air Rotor. The hollowed out Zaion construction transmits more of the vibrations from the lure providing unprecedented “feel” and sensitivity, and the reverse taper of the spool aids casting distance and accuracy, particularly with lightly weighted or even unweighted lure presentations.

Combined with super sensitive braid the 2013 Certate is the ideal reel to use on any one of the new generation Daiwa “contact rods” to fish lightly weighted soft plastics cast deep into the structure.

 

 

2 responses to “Daiwa Certate 2013 review

  1. Could you include some actual technical content? What are the internals made of, how are they assembled? How does it differ from previous models and what makes it better? How does it compare to other reels in the same price bracket? Moisture and dust getting into the ‘guts’ is the result of a poor seal or incorrect assembly. How is this a good thing and where was the point or cause of ingress?

    Your review provides no useful information to assist me in making an informed decision about buying a certate.

    • Hi AJ – thanks for your comment. I’m sorry you didn’t find it useful.

      I didn’t really just want to rehash a whole heap of technical detail because there are any number of sites that cover off that kind of information. The Daiwa Australia website is packed full of technical content.

      This review was more-so about my personal experiences and I wanted to highlight what I perceive to be one of the main benefits of this, and the vast majority of the new generation Daiwa Reels. The Certate is a beautiful reel jam packed with all the latest advancements, but what is important to me is that the Mag Seal technology will greatly improve the longevity of the equipment and will ultimately protect my investment.

      I thought this was useful information to know, and I personally wouldn’t buy another reel that doesn’t have Mag Seal.

      Regards, Greg

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